Sunderland Echo Deaths

Sunderland Echo Deaths: The Sunderland Echo is a daily newspaper that distributes its content to the North East English regions of Sunderland, South Tyneside, and East Durham. Samuel Storey, Edward Backhouse, Edward Temperley Gourley, Charles Palmer, Richard Ruddock, Thomas Glaholm, and Thomas Scott Turnbull established the newspaper in 1873 under the name Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette. They were joined in the venture by Thomas Scott Turnbull. In addition to being the first local daily publication in Sunderland, it was also designed to provide a forum for the radical viewpoints that Storey and his associates held at the time.

On the 22nd of December in 1873, Press Lane in Sunderland was the location where the first issue of the Echo was printed. A total of 1,000 copies were made, and each one was sold for a half penny.

Sunderland Echo Deaths
Sunderland Echo Deaths

The Echo prevailed despite fierce competition in its early years, the Great Depression of the 1930s, and both World Wars. During the Second World War, Sunderland was subject to heavy bombing, and although the building housing the Sunderland Echo was spared any damage, wartime regulations required the Echo to produce a rival publication. Due to a lack of available newsprint on a national scale, the newspaper went through a transition during this time period, shifting from its previous format of a broadsheet to its present style of a tabloid.

The Echo is one of the leading publishers of local and regional newspapers in the United Kingdom. It was once a member of the Johnston Press company, which is known for producing newspapers from Monday through Saturday. The newspaper has an average daily readership of 5.662 copies as of the month of December 2021.

From 1976 until April 2015, The Echo had its headquarters in Echo House, which is located on the Pennywell Industrial Estate in Sunderland. In the same year, The Echo relocated to the Rainton Meadows Industrial Estate, and then in 2019, it relocated to the North East Business and Innovation (BIC) Centre in Warfield in Sunderland. It was revealed in December 2020 that former Mirror Group chief executive David Montgomery’s company, National World, had bought JPI Media for the sum of £10.2 million. JPI Media was the owner of a number of newspapers, including the Echo.

For the subsequent one hundred years, the Echo continued to call Bridge Street its home. Old buildings were razed to the ground, and on West Wear Street, brand new machine and composing rooms were constructed. Just prior to the move, two rotary presses that were each capable of printing 24,000 copies per hour were installed. The Echo did not begin turning a profit until seven years after these adjustments were implemented, despite the fact that they led to an increase in circulation.

It was a moment of strong rivalry; the Sunderland Times changed from a bi-weekly to a daily edition in the same month that the Echo relocated to Bridge Street, and Tory supporters created their own paper, the Sunderland Daily Post. All of these events occurred in the same month. The Sunderland Times was the first to go out of business, but the Post continued to publish for the following quarter of a century, serving as a frequently contentious competitor to the Echo.

During the Second World War, Wearside was devastated, and Sunderland was one of the seven places in the United Kingdom that were bombarded the most often. The headquarters and printing facility of the Echo were spared damage despite the intense bombardment that occurred along the North East coast and along the River Wear. The Shields Gazette, the Echo’s closest competitor, did not fare as well in this endeavour. After the bombing in September 1941 that took place at its location in Chapter Row, South Shields, the publication was produced on the presses at the Echo as part of a makeshift arrangement for printing throughout the war.

Sunderland Echo Deaths
Sunderland Echo Deaths

The Echo continued to be published for the entirety of the war, despite there being severe censoring of images, paper scarcity, and a lack of correspondents. There was one significant change brought about by the conflict to the Echo, and that was the increase in size. As a result of limits placed on newsprint during the war, the size of the newspaper was lowered from broadsheet to tabloid, and it has remained in this format ever since.

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