Who Is Deborah James

Who Is Deborah James: James was a deputy head teacher at Salesian School, Chertsey, where she specialised in computer science and e-learning. She afterwards moved to the Matthew Arnold School in Staines-upon-Thames, where she worked up to the time she was diagnosed with colon cancer. James passed away in 2014. She started writing about her experience with cancer in a column for The Sun, where she also worked as a writer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deborah_James_(journalist)

Who Is Deborah James
Who Is Deborah James

She started co-hosting the podcast “You, Me, and the Big C” for BBC Radio 5 in March 2018, together with other cancer sufferers Lauren Mahon and Rachael Bland, the latter of whom passed away in September 2018. The book, titled “F*** You Cancer: How to Face the Big C, Live Your Life, and Still Be Yourself,” was published by her in October 2018.

After enduring a number of therapies, James reported in June 2021 that her cancer was progressing in the “wrong way” and that the medications she had been depending on were no longer helpful. James’s prognosis was grim.

In May of 2022, James provided an update on her health through social media, writing that she was getting hospice care at home and that “her body just couldn’t continue longer.” James also said that she had reached the point where she “just couldn’t continue anymore.”

In less than forty-eight hours after her tweet, more than three million pounds were contributed to her cause, which is called the Bowelbabe Fund. After those two days, James received the news that she had been promoted to the position of Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE). Her damehood was bestowed upon her by Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, in the residence she shares with her family.

“If only someone had believed me earlier that I wasn’t “crying wolf” – when in my normal nervous GP “question time,” I tell the doctor I think I have bowel cancer – I’m actually laughed at – not once, but three times over the course of six months! If only someone had believed me earlier that I wasn’t “crying wolf”! In spite of the fact that I was told several times that I must have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), haemorrhoids, or, worst-case scenario, colitis, the results of my blood tests and stool sample came back as “normal,” thus everything must be great!

Who is the lady with bowel cancer?

“Still, I was losing weight, coughing up blood, going to the bathroom what seemed like a hundred times a day, and generally feeling like a wreck. I had a sixth feeling that something was wrong with me, if you will, because for the first time in my life I was terrified – really afraid – of continuing with this. I realised there was something very wrong with me.

Who Is Deborah James
Who Is Deborah James

“After becoming fed up with waiting for a referral, I was fortunate enough to be able to schedule a colonoscopy for myself on my own time. However, I was so terrified that I made sure I went skiing, that I had ended the school term, and that I had bumped three appointments simply because something was telling me that this might alter everything.

“I was taken aback at 7 p.m. on Thursday, December 15, 2016, when I stared my ugly 5.5 cm cancerous, ulcerated stage 3 tumour in the face and everything went silent. I had refused the sedative and had researched what cancerous tumours would appear like in a colonoscopy (total hypochondriac geek alert!). I had also researched what cancerous tumours would appear like in a colonoscopy.

“On the other hand, I returned to the day ward weeping (maybe it was the gas and air!) and proclaimed that I know ‘he’ discovered something; I mean, I saw it too. On that particular Thursday, however, there was no activity. When the consultant asks, “Is there anybody else here with you?” you should realise that there is a problem. My biggest dream was realised as soon as the wonderful consultant walked through the door. That he had discovered a huge tumour in my body, which would need to be removed surgically, and that although he cannot be one hundred per cent positive that the tumour is malignant, there is a high probability that it is.

She recounts what led to her diagnosis as well as the symptoms that she had in an article that she wrote for Bowel Cancer UK. “If only someone had believed me earlier that I wasn’t “crying wolf” – when in my normal nervous GP “question time,” I tell the doctor I think I have bowel cancer – I’m actually laughed at – not once, but three times over the course of six months! If only someone had believed me earlier that I wasn’t “crying wolf”!

Who is Bowelbabe on Instagram?

“Despite being persuaded multiple times that I must have IBS, haemorrhoids, or, worst-case scenario, colitis,” the results of my blood tests and stool sample came back as “normal.”

“Still, I was losing weight, coughing up blood, going to the bathroom what seemed like a hundred times a day, and generally feeling like a wreck. I had a sixth feeling that something was wrong with me, if you will because for the first time in my life I was terrified – really afraid – of continuing with this. I realised there was something very wrong with me.”

Her 5.5-centimetre tumour was only discovered when she paid for a private colonoscopy, but by that point, it was too late.

Who Is Deborah James
Who Is Deborah James

It is not the first time that someone’s cancer experience has had an impression on the public, and while the outpouring of kindness in reaction to Deborah’s tale has been tremendous, it is not the first time that someone’s cancer experience has made an impact on the public.

As a result of Kylie Minogue’s breast cancer diagnosis in 2005, there was a significant rise in the number of people who went for screening for the disease, a phenomenon that became known as the “Kylie effect.” Attendance at cervical screenings increased when it was revealed that reality actress Jade Goody had been diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2008.

“When a high-profile person is diagnosed with cancer, or when they become seriously ill with cancer, this has an undeniable impact on the general public,” says Martin Ledwick, our Head Information Nurse, who also runs the charity’s nurses helpline. “When a high-profile person is diagnosed with cancer, or when they become seriously ill with cancer.”

It helps to heighten awareness in the general public of the importance of early diagnosis of cancer, often prompting people to get any symptoms they have checked and attend screenings when they are invited. “It helps to heighten awareness in the general public of the importance of early diagnosis of cancer.”

Deborah’s age of 35 when she received her diagnosis made her much younger than the typical patient diagnosed with colon cancer. People over the age of 75 make up more than forty per cent of newly diagnosed cases of colon cancer in the UK.

On Friday, the honour was bestowed upon the mother of two during a visit from the Duke of Cambridge, who paid the woman a call at her parents’ house, where she is now spending her final time with her family.

Dame Deborah said the following on her Instagram account: “My family is being great, and as emotionally draining as it all may be, we are finding so much to smile about in the midst of our loss.”

She claimed that she had been “running off pure adrenaline” for the last several days and that she had been “becoming weaker and more weary” as a result of this.

“But you can take my word for it; I’ve always maintained that when my time is up, I want to glide in sideways with a huge grin on my face, no regrets, and a large glass of champagne in my hand. This is not going to change!!!”

Who Is Deborah James
Who Is Deborah James

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